July 25, 2021

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FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 – News – New Zealand helping female coaches crack glass ceiling 

3 min read
FIFA Women's World Cup 2023™ - News - New Zealand helping female coaches crack glass ceiling 

  • New Zealand Football internet hosting native Female Coach Mentorship Programme
  • Well-known names, together with worldwide Katie Duncan, amongst 2021 members
  • Opportunity to change perceptions and create position fashions forward of 2023 World Cup

Despite some incremental change over the previous decade, the world of soccer teaching has largely been dominated by males. Just three females had been in a senior teaching position on the 16-group 2007 FIFA Women’s World Cup™, although that determine rose to 9 among the many 24-nation discipline at France 2019.

That momentum suggests the amount of female coaches can be additional enhanced when the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup takes place in somewhat over two years’ time. And in New Zealand – co-hosts of the 2023 occasion together with Australia – there are plans to not simply faucet away on the glass ceiling, however shatter it.

Tangible proof comes within the type of New Zealand Football’s (NZF) Female Coach Mentorship Programme. The programme is after all about helping the people concerned, however it’s also about visibility, position fashions and altering the narrative round female coaches. As Ashleigh Cox, New Zealand Football Women’s Development Manager, says, some female coaches “fear being the only female on a course”.

“We hope that by providing this programme we will not only open the doors up to more women wishing to make a career out of coaching at an advanced level, but also inspire more females to take up coaching at a community level with more female coach educators on the ground to deliver courses.”

The members are mentored by three of New Zealand’s high female coaches, specifically Gemma Lewis – who took half in FIFA’s 2019 Coach Mentorship Programme – Natalie Lawrence and Maia Vink, with the programme overseen by Football Ferns head coach Tom Sermanni.

Such was the standard of candidates, the members quantity was elevated to 9. Among the nicely-credentialed discipline are present nationwide league coaches and assistant coaches, present Capital Football captain Katie Barrott and former W-League common Maika Ruyter-Hooley.

But essentially the most nicely-recognized identify is undoubtedly Katie Duncan. A stalwart of the New Zealand midfield for nicely over a decade, Duncan retired quickly after a fourth Women’s World Cup choice at France 2019.

Now beginning out on a brand new a part of her soccer journey, the programme is providing one other oblique profit by helping gamers transition from athlete to educate.

“I have loved the feeling of being still ‘a part of a team’, so that aspect of coaching has really helped transition from playing to not playing, Duncan told FIFA.com. “It is great to see so many eager and young females wanting and willing to learn from what experiences and knowledge I can pass on. Most of all, I enjoy the challenge of coaching in terms of learning, and always wanting to improve.”

The 125-cap veteran says there are historically been a number of impediments to female participation in teaching. “While we’re slowly seeing a rise in females inside the sport, usually there are clearly varied causes as to why female teaching numbers are nonetheless comparatively low.

“To give a few of these examples, I think the very fact there has been a lack of role models for young female players is a big factor. From my own personal experience I know the challenges of having a young family and finding that balance between being a present mother and wife can at times be tricky. Another example may also be the pay inequality between what a coach of a female team earns compared to the men’s game.”

With the primary Women’s World Cup to be held within the southern hemisphere now on the horizon, NZF are ensuing a platform is being laid off the sector. “We hope that by providing this programme we will not only open the doors up to more women wishing to make a career out of coaching at an advanced level, but also inspire more females to take up coaching at a community level with more female coach educators on the ground to deliver courses,” Cox says.

“Participation numbers are constantly growing, there’s a FIFA Women’s World Cup in our backyard and a real desire to get more female coaches into the game. We see this as an opportunity to develop some key leaders who can then go on to educate, mentor and inspire the next generation of females looking to take up coaching.”

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